Consistent throughout all viral content, are six key ingredients or “STEPPS:” Social Currency; Triggers; Emotion; Public; Practical Value; Stories – none of which are mutually exclusive but are all independently available for use on your product or idea wherever and whenever it makes the most sense. Understanding arousal can help you drive viral content and products for yourself, by focusing less on information (features and benefits) around your product or idea, and focus on how people think, feel, and react to certain messages. “Find inner remarkability” – generate something unique, quirky, surprising, or novel. [sibwp_form id=1] Think about ways to make your product or idea stand out by breaking from tradition and what people expect from an experience; i.e. . That’s why parents often send useful articles, coupons, as well as cooking & cleaning advice to their kids – it strengthens social bonds, even when distance makes things difficult. We'll assume you're ok with this, but you can opt-out if you wish. This was a recommendation from a college teacher and I have to say a very good/informative book for digital media. Berger explains that “regardless of how plain or boring a product or idea may seem, there are ways to make it contagious…” if you know the right way to do it. It is also possible to create a trigger by expanding the “habitat” that people exist in – meaning creating new habits / further associating your product or idea with things we do on a daily basis. Self-advertising, or product or idea that transmits social proof or passive approval because usage is observed (i.e. "An infectious treatise on viral marketing. Unsurprisingly, there’s no such thing as a magic formula but Jonah Berger reveals the secret behind word-of-mouth and why people buzz about some products more than others. It doesn't have groundbreaking, unthought of revelations, but it's great for adding foundation to your marketing decisions. Anyone involved in business has observed that certain products, services or ideas seem to catch on and become wildly popular.Others ideas fall flat.Why do some ideas fail to achieve widespread acceptance despite being high quality, of good value, and endowed with hefty advertising budgets? Find helpful customer reviews and review ratings for Contagious: Why Things Catch On at Amazon.com. They had not changed their marketing campaigns, yet sales were up. Book review by Matthew Hellman, Head of strategy for GE Digital, the Americas, and Asia Pacific and Catherine Trevor-Roberts, Consultant, Resultek. People do what they can see – “monkey see, monkey do”. One because as said multiple times word of mouth marketing is free and two because as a book it says something different in comparison to all the 'social media gurus' who claim that you can do any kind of business just by sharing, liking and posting at particular times during the day. As Berger explains, “Information travels under the guise of what seems like idle chatter… we need to… (embed) our products and ideas in stories that people want to tell… [by making] our message so integral to the narrative that people can’t tell the story without it.”. Traditional marketing suggests that quality, price, and advertising are the critical factors to determine a product or idea’s ability to achieve success or popularity, but Berger argues that this misses the full view – social influence and word-of-mouth transmission are far more essential to drive “virality,” and ultimately account for 20-50% of all purchasing decisions. Jonah Berger’s “Contagious: Why Things Catch On” – Book Review, Notes + Analysis Poor Ash’s Almanack > Book Reviews > Business Overall Rating : ★★★★★ (5/7) (solid for its category) – too many weak links, whereas when you hear the word “peanut butter”, “jelly” usually is the first link we think about). When people think about your product, they will likely talk about it, share their experience with it, and become repeat customers over time. Dove asked customers to send in videos of their own stories under the rubric of “Real Beauty.” Thousands of video stories were sent in, which generated millions of views. According to Jonah Berger in “Contagious: Why Things Catch On,’’ there are six ingredients associated with messages, products, or ideas that go viral. For example, in 2007, Colleen Chorak was the Hershey brand manager tasked with revitalizing the Kit Kat brand. An incredibly frustrating and irritating book. JetBlue (low cost airline) offers first class amenities to all passengers: quality snacks, comfortable / roomy seat, DIRECTV for all. hotel and airline rewards programs… people will go out of their way to achieve status and to fly with their preferred airline (even if it means making multiple layovers), moreover they love telling others that they are a Diamond Medallion member with Delta and what their experience is as a Medallion member. Everyday low prices and free delivery on eligible orders. Overall from the scale of 1-5, I would give the book a 3.5 – 4. online dating, supporting certain causes like Mustache November… where participants raise money growing a beard during there month of November… these things start a conversation). When there is is a product, services, cause or article that provides practical applicability for someone you know, you will likely share with them. Contagious: Why Things Catch On by Jonah Berger Simon & Schuster, 256pp, £12.99 Readers might suppose that Jonah Berger’s new book would … It may seems repetitive since it has a few points to make and expands in more pages than needed. 1.2.2 Word-Of-Mouth 1.2.3 Sharing 1.2.4 Why Products Can Be Influential 1.2.5 Arousing Emotions Contagious Book Review “Contagious” is easy to read, insightful and highly applicable. 商品詳細ページを閲覧すると、ここに履歴が表示されます。チェックした商品詳細ページに簡単に戻る事が出来ます。, © 1996-2020, Amazon.com, Inc. or its affiliates. Readers might suppose that Jonah Berger’s new book, “Contagious: Why Things Catch On,” would shed light on these famous cases of viral content. In fact, more frequently trigger-associated products can increase word-of-mouth by 15 percent, and because it is top of mind, it generally means someone will be more likely to act on what they are thinking about. Berger describes this form of word-of-mouth tool as “social currency,” or the “currency” we use to buy and sell people’s opinions of us. Register for FREE updates It makes a great pair with a few more books on marketing and influencing such as “ Make to Stick “, “ The Tipping Point “, “ Triggers “, “ Brandwashed ” and “ Influence “, the big classic by Cialdini. Simon & Schuster Audio, unabridged, six CDs, 7 hrs., $29.99 ISBN 978-1-4423-5937-6 … Berger explains that “regardless of how plain or boring a product or idea may seem, there are ways to make it contagious…” if you know the right way to do it. the color red is linked with roses, Coca-Cola, cars, Valentine’s Day etc. Practical value relies heavily on buyer behavior, and Berger explains that people use “reference points” to determine the value of a good, service, or discount. Contagious: Why Things Catch On What makes things popular? “Triggers” are stimuli that connect thoughts and ideas together. I highly recommend reading it so you can get the in-depth stories and studies he tells to back up his points. But the most effective and prosperous ideas have been empowered and supported by one or more of the 6 STEPPS in some way. This book is delivers valuable info in a nice easy to read, easy to understand format. “Make people feel like insiders” – scarcity and exclusivity drives desirability… people love when they feel like “insiders” i.e. “Making things more observable, makes them easier to imitate, which makes them more likely to become popular,” writes Berger. In Contagious, Berger reveals the secret science behind word-of-mouth and social transmission. I'll admit that I enjoyed reading Jonah Berger's "Contagious: Why Things Catch On." “Contagious: Why Things Catch On” By Jonah Bergen is an eye-opening book full of not only entertaining examples of viral campaigns, but also a painstaking analysis into the science of … The key to being successful for companies is to position this useful information in a way that stands out to consumers. For example, in 1997, The Mars Candy Company noticed a spike in their Mars candy bar sales. A few years ago, Dove skin products created a viral video that showed how unrealistic professional models look in advertisements – showing how much make-up, hairspray, and photoshopping went into creating a “beautiful” advertisement. It was an interesting book, if only because it solidified the fact that I would never want to work within any profession where this book is applicable. Discover some of the key points in this book review. I struggle to believe that this was written by an academic expert - the writing style is repetitive and lacks depth. Thank you, Dr. Berger, for this elucidating and very useful book. I take it as a concept book which helps put the thoughts in order and explain why marketing messages work where others not. Jonah Berger 1.1 Key Insights 1.2 Key Points 1.2.1 What Makes A Product Shareable? logos on shirts, the message at the end of an email sent on iPhone: “Sent from my iPhone” etc.). Read honest and unbiased product reviews from our users. Love the little stories that are used as examples. In fact, “word-of-mouth,” he explains, is effective because it is more persuasive (people trust what others tell them much more than they trust ads they see on T.V.) Emotional content evokes feelings, both positive and negative, that drive people to share and act on those emotions. Never read anything on business and promo in the digital age and this was great place to start. It helps merchants increase the likelihood that people buy your product and share with others. no spam! BOOK REVIEW: “Contagious: Why Things Catch On” by Jonah Berger, “Crowdsourcing, Innovation, and the Tyranny of Ideas” – An Interview with jovoto’s Bastian Unterberg, Tim Aßmann, and Liz von Loewen, “What’s Next for Marketing?” – An Interview with Sundar Bharadwaj, “When Logic meets Intuition: The Squircle” – an interview with Francis Cholle, “Ending the War Between Sales and Marketing” – An Interview with Philip Kotler and Neil Rackham, “Harnessing Your Personal Narrative” – An interview with John Hagel, “Consumer Boycotts: An Essential Method of Peaceful Protest” – Philip Kotler, “The Rise of 5 New-Normal Lifestyles” – Philip Kotler. They would be wrong. For example, “I voted” stickers after voting make the private act less private and reminds others to vote too. Berger provides the following example to illustrate this rule: Say you see someone you know and respect using an Apple Computer at a cafe (identified by the Apple logo and exterior casing), this form of public visibility might mean that you are likely to want to imitate their behavior and buy a Mac because it looks cool or because you want to emulate their behavior. The spots did exactly as she hoped, and soon sales increased by 8% by the end of the year. If you find a great bargain, you will probably describe your entire experience when you recommend the deal to your friends. When it comes to pricing, “diminishing sensitivity” can influence buyer behavior, which is where the “Rule of 100” becomes handy. The video encourages the viewer to be natural and to be happy in one’s own skin. I'm not an expert on social media or even word of mouth marketing but I ve tried my fair amount during my time at university. Makes me want to check out the authors other titles. Thus, it is important to think about context of the environment of the people you are trying to target: whether seasonal (candy corn and Halloween); geographic (cheesesteaks and Philadelphia). Still, the psychology about why certain things “go viral,” has always interested me, and it applies to my everyday work of trying to spread a concept and story through the culture of a large organization. Effective triggers are caused by frequency (how often we interact with a trigger i.e. To get consumers thinking about the brand again she looked at when people ate Kit Kats the most… during breaks and usually with a hot beverage. It feels very intuitive and I am looking to try it out as soon as possible! Book Review: 'Contagious: Why Things Catch On' by Jonah Berger By A. Jurek, BLOGCRITICS.ORG Published 10:00 pm PDT, Sunday, August 18, 2013 Ever wonder why some things catch on? . ネットを漂流すると、色んな炎上が散見される。ではどんなコンテンツが広がりがちでどんなコンテンツなら広がらないのだろう?本書はそれを調べている。, Writing style makes this difficult to take seriously. “Good game mechanics keep people engaged, motivated, and always wanting more.” i.e. Well constructured , gives 7 well defined concepts and walks you through each one, and when combined you get a very clear blow by blow understanding of why some ideas are contagious. It turned out that during that same period, NASA was organizing a mission to Mars to collect samples and data from the planet – and with the continuous news cycle featuring NASAs and the planet Mars (the candy/company is named after the founder, not the planet), the news triggered the idea of the candy in people’s minds, and sure enough sales spiked. This book provides a set of specific Buy Contagious: Why Things Catch on by Berger, Jonah (ISBN: 9781451686579) from Amazon's Book Store. Berger calls the concept of looking at what others are doing to resolve our own uncertainty, “social proof.” Individuals imitate actions, because other’s choices provide information that helps them decide how to do something. Berger explains that certain emotions evoke action while causing others to stifle: Awe, excitement, humor evoke as much arousal as anger and anxiety, while contentment and sadness leave people to do nothing at all. Book Review I am a student of the University of Baltimore and I am writing a review for this book for an assignment. It is full with real life examples and with research results. 。クラウドに好きなだけ写真も保存可能。. © 2016-19 The Marketing Journal and the individual author(s). She began releasing ads that tied Kit Kats to coffee breaks at work, specifically eating them while drinking coffee. Very clear, interesting and well written. Contagious – Why Things Catch On by Jonah Berger (Professor of Marketing at The Wharton School of Business, University of Pennsylvania) distills years of research into understanding why certain ads, products, YouTube videos, political movements, songs, and/or restaurants catch on, while others are ignored. Contagious: Why Things Catch On So I won this in a goodreads give away. Moreover, products and ideas with practical value is passed along to help others despite geographic distances. This book is well researched, accessible and just an eye opener when it comes to today's practices of guerrilla marketing. Contagious: Why Things Catch On Jonah Berger No preview available - 2013 View all » Common terms and phrases actually advertising asked … Companies and individuals can use this to their advantage, by providing their customers with products, experiences, and content that connect directly with them in a way that encourages sharing with others, while promoting the company’s ideas, causes and/or products simultaneously. . Some products, ideas, services, and behaviors catch on and become popular while others falter. Behavioral residue, or remnants that a product, idea or story leave behind after use or purchase. Book review “Contagious: Why Things Catch on” book review May 29, 2013 I just finished this book by Johnah Berger. This website uses cookies to improve your experience. The 6 STEPPS are explained with some great stories and are simple to make use of for your own products and ideas. and more targeted (people share stories with those who are actually interested in the topic). Or, reusable bags from Lululemon, event participation t-shirts, and Livestrong yellow wrist-bands provide the public a glimpse of what the individual believes or likes. This is a breakdown of the book Contagious : Things Catch On by Jonah Berger. Interestingly, only 7% of word-of-mouth content is shared online (Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram are merely tools to help support the spread of good ideas, not the answer to adoption), and while social media can help us reach millions of people, often face-to-face interactions are more effective and allow people to focus on the topic at hand (instead of sorting through the hordes of data online). Written by an academic in a very simplified way to be easily digested by anyone. All Rights Reserved. Home / Books / Book Reviews / Book Review: ‘Contagious: Why Things Catch On’ by Jonah Berger Engrossing review of the insights from research into the psychology of … People binge drink in college, because they see their peers doing the same. CEO’s, marketers, politicians, sociologists, and entrepreneurs alike, expend excessive time and resources to explore new ways to fuel buzz around their latest products, service, advertisements, campaigns or causes – yet without clear structure, it’s easy to spend millions of marketing dollars on methods that miss the mark every time. If you get someone bought in, they will likely tell their friends and family about it, thus beginning the cycle of creating something viral. The reader is evidently expected to be amazed by stories in which every detail is explained as if to a child. If you've wondered why certain stories get shared, e-mails get forwarded, or videos go viral, Contagious explains why, and shows how to leverage these concepts to craft contagious content. ‘“Leverage game mechanics” – use elements of a game to make something fun, interesting, and hook the consumer. “Making the private public” suggests that if you can bring something to the surface that others previously had been too embarrassed to talk about – you can eliminate stigma around products, services, and ideas that were previously consumed privately and help it catch on with people who had previously felt uncomfortable discussing this out loud (i.e. What we talk about, inevitably determines what others perceive of us, which leads us to share things that make us seem more entertaining, clever, smart, and/or funny. Berger provides the example, of looking for a restaurant in an unfamiliar city: we look for restaurants that are full of people (because it must be delicious or hip), and we walk by the restaurants that are empty (food too expensive or bland). By making our products more public, we create self-promoting ideas that produce lasting memories that stick around well after the first interaction. Ru La La is a member-only (originally invite only, now they allow for anyone to sign up) online flash sale clothing website providing daily deals on high fashion at discounted prices to those who are on their distribution list (aka the insiders). In many cases, it can drive activism in politics, switching from one product to another, or writing a Yelp review online to encourage people to eat or not eat at a certain cafe. 1 Contagious: Why Things Catch On By. Practical value is all about sharing useful information that will help others save time, energy and resources. But what if we could use research in a way that helps us understand how things go viral? In this ‘Contagious: Why Things Catch On’ review, we’ll explore exactly that. Amazon.com で、Contagious: Why Things Catch On の役立つカスタマーレビューとレビュー評価をご覧ください。ユーザーの皆様からの正直で公平な製品レビューをお読みください。 Leveraging good stories that are useful, engaging, and that drive value will help you and your product, idea, cause increase social influence and word-of-mouth transmission and propel it to be the next big thing. Over all this was a pretty good read for, a little slow at times and at times was hard for me to want to keep up with, but for the most part had very useful information, especially for this day in age when things go viral quickly. The author, Jonah Berger, has spent over a decade researching why some things catch on and why other things don't. To do so, it’s important to create one of the following three things: The key to being successful across all of these factors, is to build intrinsic motivation within people – if something is truly successful, people will want to talk about or buy into your product or service if it means they will gain value from the product or experience, as well as look good to others. Fast pace and easy to understand book. Really good, really clear, gives enough information to get the messages across but doesn't labour any of the points. 全体的な星の評価と星ごとの割合の内訳を計算するために、単純な平均は使用されません。その代わり、レビューの日時がどれだけ新しいかや、レビューアーがAmazonで商品を購入したかどうかなどが考慮されます。また、レビューを分析して信頼性が検証されます。, このページは JavaScript が有効になっている場合に最適に機能します。それを無効にすると、いくつかの機能が無効になる、または欠如する可能性があります。それでも製品のすべてのカスタマーレビューを表示することは可能です。, さらに、映画もTV番組も見放題。200万曲が聴き放題 He's a world-renowned expert on social influence, word of mouth, and why products, ideas, and behaviors catch on and has published over 50 papers in top-tier academic journals. Love the little stories that are used as examples, I couldn't stop sharing them around my peers. We will write a custom Book Review on “Contagious: Why Things Catch On” by Jonah Berger specifically for you for only $16.05 $11/page 301 certified writers online It's a good book in that it gives you proof points and examples for what makes something viral. Humans think in terms of narratives, which is why we frequently recall and share stories. Tax hikes, price increases, new iPhone releases, elections and policy stances – all evoke positive and negative outbursts that drive people to talk about it with those around them. If the product sells for less than $100, sale price should be set in terms of the percentage reduction (discounts as a percentage seems more impressive on low priced items), If it’s greater than $100, discount the price in dollar reduction (discounts as a dollar seem more impressive on high cost items). So, they make choices based on what they see. He has consulted for a range of Fortune 500 companies, keynoted hundreds of events, and popular accounts of his work often appear in places like The New York Times , The Wall Street Journal , and Harvard Business Review . Consistent throughout all viral content, are six key ingredients or “STEPPS:” Social Currency; Triggers; Emotion; Public; Practical Value; Stories – none of which are mutually exclusive but are all independently available for use on your product or idea wherever and whenever it makes the most sense. Standing out in today’s market is harder than ever as advertising clutter projects 4,000 – 10,000 ads and brands at American consumers every day. The general rule: Stories are the most effective way to share ideas and information. Contagious: Why Things Catch On Jonah Berger, read by Keith Nobbs. Most people miss superfluous details, so to get customers to think about your product or idea, weave it into a story with key factors critical to your brand and add other “sticky” factors: humor, creativity, quirky. Observability plays a huge role in what products or ideas catch on. I added it to my audible wish I find the subject both interesting and useful; shame this book reads as if it were written with a reader of limited attention span and intelligence in mind. coffee vs. hot chocolate – people see and think about coffee every day, whereas hot chocolate is more seasonal, so associating with coffee is far more effective) and strength of the link (more unusual links are better than those that are associated with too many things, i.e. If you want to start a small business or even just a professional YouTube or Instagram account I'd suggest starting with this one. By designing products and ideas that are linked to our surroundings, it helps to set off frequent “lightbulbs” or “triggers” in people’s mind. The story was only a few minutes long – but it told a positive story, while simultaneously plugging the Dove brand. The candy bar’s jingle had been around for 21 years, and had run its course. If it had a bit more extensive primary research it would be even better, but I guess that's where " the science of sharing" comes in. A really insightful book. While social currency gets people to talk about things, “triggers” keep ideas and products fresh in the minds of consumers, ensuring that they keep talking about your idea. The human brain is hot-wired to use this so-called “currency” to make a good impression on others. Going viral is every marketer’s dream, and Jonah Berger explains how to infect the world with your brand in his bestseller, Contagious: Why Things Catch On. 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While simultaneously plugging the Dove brand book Contagious: Why Things Catch on. contagious: why things catch on book review. Examples and with research results only a few minutes long – but it 's great for adding foundation your. For example, “ I voted ” stickers after voting make the private act less private and reminds others vote! Something unique, quirky, surprising, or product or idea stand out breaking... I 'll admit that I enjoyed reading Jonah Berger 1.1 key Insights key. Triggers ” are stimuli that connect thoughts and ideas together our products more public, we ’ explore... And always wanting more. ” i.e are caused by frequency ( how often we with...
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